The Wood Guide

When it comes to purchasing handmade furniture, it’s understandable that you would want something that matches your style, while still providing the absolute best quality.

The Wood Guide

Submitted by Swiss Valley Furniture on Thu, 09/15/2016 - 3:36am

When it comes to purchasing handmade furniture, it’s understandable that you would want something that matches your style, while still providing the absolute best quality. But as our Ohio wooden furniture experts explain, the type of wood you choose for your furniture not only has a direct impact on the appearance of your wood products, but also their durability, finishing options, and cost. Here’s a brief look at some of the most popular types of wood we here, at Swiss Valley Furniture, use for our handmade furniture:

Oak: We primarily use red oak, which features small knots, color variations, and burls which add a unique character to each of our wood products. This durable wood’s great value makes it a popular choice. We also use quarter sawn oak, which exposes a different side of the grain for a beautiful look.

Cherry: With its smooth grain and gorgeous pink heartwood, cherry is a popular, elegant choice. While many wood products use a select grade of cherry that is free from knots and pits, we can also use sap cherry and rustic cherry, which utilizes sap streaks and heavy knots for a unique rustic look that is also less expensive.

Maple: We use two varieties of maple. White maple is very light in color and has almost no grain, which is why it is only suitable for natural stains. Less durable brown maple, on the other hand, is more easily stained and comes with a fine texture that makes it a popular choice for buyers who wish to add paint colors to their handmade furniture.

Hickory: This exquisite hardwood is truly unique. Hickory wood products can serve as incredible natural art thanks to their characteristic patterns. Because of this, we only recommend using a natural stain for hickory. Elm, on the other hand, comes with a distinct, exquisite grain that stands out even more with a darker stain.

Elm: Elm is another unique hardwood that has a high tolerance to splitting. It is a strong wood known for its interlocking grain and its resistance to decay. Due to having a distinct grain, darker stains look best with this type of wood.